Why You Might Want to Become a Certified Crochet Instructor Even if You Never Plan on Teaching

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It took two hundred thirty-one days from the time I enrolled in the Craft Yarn Council’s Certified Instructors Program (CIP) to the day I received my certificate and pin. In that time not only did I learn a lot about crochet, but I learned a lot about myself. I learned that I hate having a deadline, but I also learned that I will finish something if I commit to it. I learned how to make a ripple stitch and that you shouldn’t overstretch it when blocking just to make it the perfect 5″ square. I also learned that I’m a total badass when it comes to weaving in my ends!

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The Nuts and Bolts

The Craft Yarn Council’s Certified Instructors Program (CIP) is a self-paced correspondence curriculum. Students have six months to complete their crochet samples and send them in to their Master Teacher, but you have an additional six months to complete the required fifteen hours of teaching.  The program is broken up into two sections, Crochet Techniques and Teacher’s Handbook. The materials are very well organized and detailed explanations are given for each sample as well as lesson planning. The total cost is $85, but you will need to supply your own yarn, notebook for sending in your coursework, and you will need to pay to have it shipped to your Master Teacher.

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I really believe this program is beneficial for every crocheter, even if teaching isn’t the goal! First learning how to do things correctly is pure gold. The internet is full of tutorials and videos showing how to crochet practically anything, but occasionally there are mistakes. I recently found one when looking through a very popular crochet site and was surprised to see that the woman teaching a fundamental technique wasn’t doing it correctly. Crochet is also a craft that has been handed down from one person to another and it isn’t always taught the proper way. Now the goal isn’t to crochet correctly for correctness sake! Reducing fundamental mistakes will reduce big headaches down the road. It’s not to be nit-picky but to ensure a happy, stress free outcome!

The second, and I believe the most important reason to become a Certified Crochet Instructor, is because inevitably someone is going to ask you to teach them to crochet. I’m sure you’ve already experienced it!  There seems to be a renaissance in handicrafts happening around the world and more and more people want to get back to doing things the way their grandmothers did them! The availability of tutorials on YouTube is wonderful but there’s nothing like sitting down with another human being and learning how to do something useful and beautiful.

Craft Yarn Council’s Certified Instructors Program (CIP)

Have any questions about the program? I’ll be more than happy to answer them in the comments below! Thanks so much for reading and I hope you found this post beneficial!

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You Can Make Amigurumi: A Tale of Two Walters

NOTE: My two classes at Cheers to Ewe are almost here! Last chance to sign up!

Crochet 101: August 11, 18, and 25 from 10:00 – 11:30

Victor Frog: August 11, 18, and 25 from 1:00 – 2:30

Check out this link for more info: Classes

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Please forgive my boldness, but I’m freakin’ proud of my new wolf, Walter. He turned out so darn cute! I love his sweet face and those perky little ears. And those mittens!!!!

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Above is a side-by-side photo of new Walter on the left and old Walter on the right. I made old Walter in January 2018 and new Walter in August 2018. That’s just eight months apart.

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You can see that old Walter is quite a bit bigger. You may be able to see that his stuffing can be seen through the large stitches on his legs.

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His nose is totally wonky! He has button eyes. His ears are floppy. He is squishy. Now don’t take me wrong. I still love Walter. His imperfections give him such personality! But as someone who likes to sell my creations, I need them to be a little more polished.

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New Walter is much more consistent throughout. The stitches are uniform. The color changes aren’t messy. His mittens actually fit and wont’ fall off. His nose is fairly even and joined more evenly.

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Amigurumi takes practice. Lots of practice. But I’m here to show you that after only eight months I improved. A lot! With practice also comes confidence. I am able to make patterns exactly as they are written or add my own embellishments.

I often hear people lament that they could never make amigurumi. Really they should say, they don’t want to make amigurumi. If someone with two working hands wants to make these animals there is no reason why they couldn’t. It will take practice, determination, and hard work. But they are SO worth it!