A Room of Her Own: A Tour of My Little Crochet Room and What it Means to Me

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I was an Oprah Winfrey disciple from 1986 until her show went off the air in 2011. Every afternoon at 4:00 was my time and I rarely let anything get in the way. I became a mother in 1995 and Oprah became my respite. We added children to our family in 1997, 1999, and 2002 and Oprah continued to be a little slice of sanity carved out just for me.

In 1997 Oprah featured the interior designer, Chris Madden, who discussed the importance for women to have a space of her own, and she even wrote a book about it. During that time, with two little girls and a small home, I couldn’t image such luxury but I longed for the day when that could become a reality.

A Room of Her Own: Women’s Personal Spaces

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Fast forward twenty-one years and I now have that space. With two grown daughters out of the house I found myself with an extra bedroom! It certainly needed to double as a place for guests, but for most of the year it sat empty.

It was a fairly easy process to make this my little crochet room since most of the girls’ belongings  had already been either taken to their new destinations or packed away for safe keeping. It was just a matter of looking at the space, rearranging some furniture and deciding the best way to use the space for my crochet accoutrement.

The space is quite small. It’s just big enough for a full sized bed and the additional furniture is really too large for the room, but is useful. Since I only use the room for guests a few weeks a year, it works for my purposes.

Having a space dedicated to my dreams, my creations, and my creativity is a luxury I could only have dreamed of. When all four of my children were young I didn’t have the time or energy for anything creative. I barely had time to breathe. I tried my hand at a few crafts during those years but the effort was more than I could muster. I would look at women who were creative and artistic and feel a pang of jealousy. I just wanted a moment and a space to call all my own.

Now when I step into the room I feel inspired. This is my space, a place that encourages my creativity.

I hope you enjoy this little tour of my humble space, and my heart’s desire is for you to have a place to call your own one day as well!

I also love using pieces and things I already have around the house and repurposing them! The little black alligator tote below used to be a makeup caddy. It was stored in the basement and once I found it, I knew it would be the perfect spot to store crochet hooks, yarn needles, embroidery floss, etc.

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This little set of cubbies once held teenage girl DVDs, books, and beauty products. Now it is a place for my yarn. I divide them between fiber type and weight. Currently my wool blend and worsted weight bins are full to bursting!

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This little piece also serves as a nice little spot to display my certificate and pin from the Craft Yarn Council. (Here’s a link in case you’re interested in reading more about the Certified Instructor Program – Why You Might Want to Become a Certified Crochet Instructor Even if You Never Plan on Teaching)

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I decided early on that I needed a way to organize patterns that aren’t in books. I used an old bankers box that I already had, and I love the bright yellow color! Each pattern has its very own file folder.

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I use Post-It notes to label each file for easy finding later!

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I love keeping my blocking mats and spray bottle out at all times. It is so convenient not having to hunt for them or find a place to lay them out. (Link to blocking mats – Hephaestus Crafts Blocking Mats for Knitting – Pack of 9 GRAY Blocking Boards with Grids for Needlepoint or Crochet. 150 T-pins)

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I have my Simply Crochet magazines out at all times for inspiration and their bright colors make me so happy! I also use mason jars to store scraps of pretty ribbon and embroidery floss.

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I began keeping my yarn labels in order to be able to identify the color and all information about the yarn. I add a scrap of yarn to each label, which makes it very easy for ordering later. IMG_5901

I keep them all in a little turquoise bin!

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The room is not grand, or big, or unique, but it is so very special to me. Thanks for stopping by! Let me know if you have any questions or suggestions for how you like to organize your creative clutter!

Disclosure: Please note that some of the links above are affiliate links, and at no cost to you, I will earn a teeny, tiny commission if you decide to purchase them from Amazon. These are products that I know, love, and trust. I have and will continue to recommend them regardless of my affiliate relationship with Amazon. Thank you for supporting Le Petit Saint Crochet!

 

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Why You Might Want to Become a Certified Crochet Instructor Even if You Never Plan on Teaching

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It took two hundred thirty-one days from the time I enrolled in the Craft Yarn Council’s Certified Instructors Program (CIP) to the day I received my certificate and pin. In that time not only did I learn a lot about crochet, but I learned a lot about myself. I learned that I hate having a deadline, but I also learned that I will finish something if I commit to it. I learned how to make a ripple stitch and that you shouldn’t overstretch it when blocking just to make it the perfect 5″ square. I also learned that I’m a total badass when it comes to weaving in my ends!

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The Nuts and Bolts

The Craft Yarn Council’s Certified Instructors Program (CIP) is a self-paced correspondence curriculum. Students have six months to complete their crochet samples and send them in to their Master Teacher, but you have an additional six months to complete the required fifteen hours of teaching.  The program is broken up into two sections, Crochet Techniques and Teacher’s Handbook. The materials are very well organized and detailed explanations are given for each sample as well as lesson planning. The total cost is $85, but you will need to supply your own yarn, notebook for sending in your coursework, and you will need to pay to have it shipped to your Master Teacher.

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I really believe this program is beneficial for every crocheter, even if teaching isn’t the goal! First learning how to do things correctly is pure gold. The internet is full of tutorials and videos showing how to crochet practically anything, but occasionally there are mistakes. I recently found one when looking through a very popular crochet site and was surprised to see that the woman teaching a fundamental technique wasn’t doing it correctly. Crochet is also a craft that has been handed down from one person to another and it isn’t always taught the proper way. Now the goal isn’t to crochet correctly for correctness sake! Reducing fundamental mistakes will reduce big headaches down the road. It’s not to be nit-picky but to ensure a happy, stress free outcome!

The second, and I believe the most important reason to become a Certified Crochet Instructor, is because inevitably someone is going to ask you to teach them to crochet. I’m sure you’ve already experienced it!  There seems to be a renaissance in handicrafts happening around the world and more and more people want to get back to doing things the way their grandmothers did them! The availability of tutorials on YouTube is wonderful but there’s nothing like sitting down with another human being and learning how to do something useful and beautiful.

Craft Yarn Council’s Certified Instructors Program (CIP)

Have any questions about the program? I’ll be more than happy to answer them in the comments below! Thanks so much for reading and I hope you found this post beneficial!